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Argumentative Essay On Raising Tuition

College Tuition Is Too Expensive Essay

College Tuition Is Too Expensive
There are many colleges around the world and most people like to attend one. Students study hard and try their best just so they can get an acceptance letter from their dream college. However, college tuition is not that affordable; college tuition is increasing in price every single year while the yearly salary of a father stays the same or barely increases. College tuition should be affordable to everyone regardless of his or her family status and position. Students should be able to attend a college without being in a debt consisting of thousands of dollars. There are scholarships, grants and financial aid available but that does not help everyone. A middle class family cannot fully afford a child going to a 4-year college and make a living, which is comfortably in residence. A change in college tuition is definitely required for American students and the students around the world to have a better education at low cost.
The cost of out of state college is almost 40% more than an in state college. Thou some families make enough money that they won’t need financial aids and grants for their children’s to go to college but the amount of families is really low compared to the families who can only rely on financial aids for their children’s to go to a decent college and get an education. Fathers and Mothers work hard to earn the money and many students do not want their parents spending that much money to get an education. That statement clearly says that the cost of getting an education is too high in America and many other places. In recent years, more and more students are planning to go to a college. In a competitive economy, good employers can only afford to hire a small amount of new employees. As a common result, they look for the best applicant with the best skills and education. Usually, the chosen employee is the one with advance training who have attended a 4-year university; which is now a necessary input in a resume. Unfortunately, many bright and intelligent students are denied only because of financial restrains and the fact that they could not receive a higher education because of that. If more people are able to get a better paying job then that will only help the economy; when people have more people, they tend to spend more money, causing the economy to grow and forcing the companies to hire more employees. Government subsidization of tuition contains a very high potential of making the economy grow.
Many of people’s taxes go towards scholarship money and grants but that does not even cover 10% of the tuition cost that the student have to pay with his or her money. More and more people these days want to attend a college and...

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In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Land Grant College Act into law, laying the groundwork for the largest system of publicly funded universities in the world. Some of America’s greatest colleges, including the University of Minnesota, were created by federal land grants, and were known as “democracy’s colleges” or “people’s colleges.”

But that vision of a “people’s college” seems awfully remote to a growing number of American students crushed under soaring tuitions and mounting debt. One hundred and fifty years after Lincoln made his pledge, it’s time to make public colleges and universities free for every American.

This idea is easier than it looks. For most of our nation’s history, public colleges and universities have been much more affordable than they are today, with lower tuition, and financial aid that covered a much larger portion of the costs. The first step in making college accessible again, and returning to an education system that serves every American, is addressing the student loan debt crisis. 

The cost of attending a four-year college has increased by 1,122 percent since 1978. Galloping tuition hikes have made attending college more expensive today than at any point in U.S. history. At the same time, debt from student loans has become the largest form of personal debt in America—bigger than credit card debt and auto loans. Last year, 38 million American students owed more than $1.3 trillion in student loans.

Once, a degree used to mean a brighter future for college graduates, access to the middle class, and economic stability. Today, student loan debt increases inequality and makes it harder for low-income graduates, particularly those of color, to buy a house, open a business, and start a family.

The solution lies in federal investments to states to lower the overall cost of public colleges and universities. In exchange, states would commit to reinvesting state funds in higher education. Any public college or university that benefited from the reinvestment program would be required to limit tuition increases. This federal-state partnership would help lower tuition for all students. Schools that lowered tuition would receive additional federal grants based on the degree to which costs are lowered.

Reinvesting in higher education programs like Pell Grants and work-study would ensure that Pell and other forms of financial aid that students don’t need to pay back would cover a greater portion of tuition costs for low-income students. In addition, states that participate in this partnership would ensure that low-income students who attend state colleges and universities could afford non-tuition expenses like textbooks and housing fees. This proposal is one way to ensure that no student graduates with loans to pay back.

If the nation can provide hundreds of billions of dollars in subsidies to the oil and gas industry and billions of dollars more to Wall Street, we can afford to pay for public higher education. A tax on financial transactions like derivatives and stock trades would cover the cost. Building a truly affordable higher education system is an investment that would pay off economically.

Eliminating student loan debt is the first step, but it’s not the last. Once we ensure that student loan debt isn’t a barrier to going to college, we should reframe how we think about higher education. College shouldn’t just be debt free—it should be free. Period.

We all help pay for our local high schools and kindergartens, whether or not we send our kids to them. And all parents have the option of choosing public schools, even if they can afford private institutions. Free primary and secondary schooling is good for our economy, strengthens our democracy, and most importantly, is critical for our children’s health and future. Educating our kids is one of our community’s most important responsibilities, and it’s a right that every one of us enjoys. So why not extend public schooling to higher education as well?

Some might object that average Americans should not have to pay for students from wealthy families to go to school. But certain things should be guaranteed to all Americans, poor or rich. It’s not a coincidence that some of the most important social programs in our government’s history have applied to all citizens, and not just to those struggling to make ends meet.

Universal programs are usually stronger and more stable over the long term, and they’re less frequently targeted by budget cuts and partisan attacks. Public schools have stood the test of time—let’s make sure public colleges and universities do, too. 

The United States has long been committed to educating all its people, not only its elites.

This country is also the wealthiest in the history of the world. We can afford to make college an option for every American family.